Cash In Your Coins receives NLG Extraordinary Merit Award

NLG Extraordinary Merit Award - Cash In Your Coins

Author Beth Deisher and Whitman Publisher Dennis Tucker show off the NLG Extraordinary Merit award won by the second edition of Cash In Your Coins — Selling the Rare Coins You’ve Inherited at the Numismatic Literary Guild’s banquet Aug. 13.

The second edition of my book, Cash In Your Coins — Selling the Rare Coins You’ve Inherited  received an “Extraordinary Merit” award during the Numismatic Literary Guild’s annual awards banquet Aug. 13, held in conjunction with the recent American Numismatic Association’s World’s Fair of Money in Rosemont, IL.

I accepted the award and mentioned that I have been extremely pleased to be able to provide guidance to so many people.  While at the World’s Fair of Money I participated in two Whitman Publishing “meet-the-author” sessions, autographing books and answering questions directly from WFOM attendees.

I wrote Cash In Your Coins to inform and protect the hundreds of thousands of Americans who already collect coins, and those who will someday inherit their collections.

The 304-page expanded second edition, published in September 2014, followed the sell-out of the award-winning first edition. The first edition, published in June 2013, won the Numismatic Literary Guild’s “Best Specialized Book on Numismatic Investments” award for 2014, and a first-place nonfiction award by Ohio Professional Writers

The second edition is expanded with 16 additional pages, updated case studies, and a new chapter on taxes, new illustrations, and more.

Whitman Publishing, LLC, of Atlanta published both editions of my book.

Autographed copies of Cash In Your Coins — Selling the Rare Coins You’ve Inherited are available directly from my website at cashinyourcoins-book.com and non-autographed copies are available in retail bookstores as well as at Whitman.com.

Panelists sought better designs for all Olympic Coins

When Olympic coins were considered, panelists sought better designs for all coins. All wanted U.S. coins to “become the best,” suggesting some steps taken in recent years. This article From the Memory Bank series was first published in the August 24, 2015 issue of Coin World, available here.
Olympic Coins - Cash In Your Coins

When seeking designs for 1984 Olympic coins, experts sought to improve all U.S. coinage designs. Image courtesy of Coin World.

Rather than build new athletic venues, the United States Olympic Committee and the Los Angeles Olympic Organizing Committee opted to rely mostly on existing venues and to seek corporate funding and surcharges from sales of commemorative coins to finance hosting the Games of the XXIII Olympiad.

The opening ceremonies of the 1984 Summer Olympics were to be held in the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, which had been built for the 1932 Games.

The LAOOC decided it wanted something special for the opening ceremony and commissioned California sculptor Robert Graham in 1981 to create a public sculpture to stand in front of the stadium entrance.

The numismatic community was focused on the commemorative coins. After an exhaustive legislative battle over the number of coins to be issued and private versus government control, a three-coin program prevailed, with the U.S. Mint in charge.

Chief Sculptor-Engraver Elizabeth Jones’ Olympic Discus Thrower design for the 1983 silver dollar underwent some minor tinkering after the initial design was made public. But collectors greeted it with enthusiasm.

However, the collecting public was shocked to find headless nude male and female athletic torsos as the principal design element for the obverse of the 1984 Olympic silver dollar. Collectors fiercely questioned the headless aspect. But the designer, Robert Graham, countered that it was his way of honoring athletes in general rather than feature specific athletes.

Despite criticism, the coin design was used. The design and the choice of designer was fait accompli, apparently in closed-door discussions between the LAOOC and Treasury officials.

The noncollecting public seemed oblivious to the coin design controversy until June 1, 1984, when Graham’s Olympic Gateway sculpture was unveiled.

The 25-foot sculpture features the bronze headless nude male and female athletic torsos separated by an Olympic flame on a beam supported by two columns.

The sculpture’s unveiling brought quick criticism: Some proffered that the headless figures were suggestive of violence but most comments centered on other anatomical detail as being too realistic.

Treasury officials’ decision to invite a non-Mint engraver to design a U.S. commemorative coin would prove pivotal in later years.

Numismatic Literary Guild tribute to Margo Russell

I will join Coin World Managing Editor William T. Gibbs and former Coin World staff members David T. Alexander and Thomas K. DeLorey in leading the Numismatic Literary Guild tribute to Margo Russell.

Logo of Numismatic Literary Guild - Cash In Your CoinsThe tribute will be among the special events taking place during the NLG Bash Aug. 13, which begins at 7:30 p.m. at the Hyatt Regency O’Hare Hotel in Rosemont, Ill.

Margo passed away Jan. 26, 2015, at the age of 95. She was editor of Coin World from 1962 until her retirement in early 1985.  A pioneer in numismatic journalism, Margo was an early leader in the NLG, having been honored with its highest award, The Clemy, in 1971.  She was inducted into the Numismatic Hall of Fame in 1986.

The tribute will salute her many contributions to the numismatic community, her leadership in numismatic publishing, and her great sense of humor.

World’s Fair of Money 2015

World's Fair Of Money 2015 - Cash In Your CoinsI will be autographing my book, Cash In Your Coins — Selling the Rare Coins You’ve Inherited and available to answer your questions during the upcoming American Numismatic Association’s World’s Fair of Money 2015 at the Donald E. Stephens Convention Center in Rosemont, Ill.

I will be at Whitman Publishing’s booth on the WFOM bourse from 2:30 to 3 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 12, and from 11 to 11:30 a.m. on Thursday, Aug. 13.

Books will be available for purchase at the Whitman booth. If you have already purchased a copy of my book from your local bookstore, bring it along and I will be happy to autograph it for you. Or, just stop by to say hello.

To learn more about WFOM 2015 or to review the show guide and take advantage of a $2 off admission coupon for non-ANA members, visit the American Numismatic Association website.

If you’re unable to attend but have a question for me, please submit our Ask Beth form and I’ll respond as quickly as possible.

I hope to see you next week!

Annunzio critical of Olympic coin designs – From the Memory Bank

Annunzio critical of Olympic coin designs: Pans Los Angeles Olympic commemorative coinage. This article From the Memory Bank series was first published in the July 27, 2015 issue of Coin World, available here.
Concept Design Sketches - Cash In Your Coins

Treasury officials released concept design sketches for the 1983 silver dollar, the 1984 silver dollar and the 1984 $10 gold eagle on Oct. 14, 1982, just 52 days after the authorizing legislation was signed into law.

On July 22, 1982, when President Reagan signed legislation authorizing commemorative coins honoring the 1984 Los Angeles Olympic Games, House Banking Consumer Affairs and Coinage Subcommittee Chairman Frank D. Annunzio was hailed as a hero in the numismatic community.

He had outwitted and out-legislated foes in both the House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate who had backed proposals for 29, then 25, and then 17 different Olympic coin designs to be marketed by the private sector.

He had persuaded a majority in the House to vote for his compromise, which authorized two silver dollars and one gold $10 coin with the U.S. Treasury in control of marketing, and the Senate had agreed to his compromise.

Annunzio barely had time for a victory lap before controversy over designs for the three coins dominated the news. During an Oct. 14 news conference, U.S. Treasurer Angela “Bay” Buchanan and Mint Director Donna Pope, flanked by Olympic officials, unveiled designs for the three coins.

While sculptor Robert Graham’s Olympic Gateway coin design featuring his headless nude male and female athletic torsos for the 1984 silver dollar received the most criticism, designs produced by Mint artists also came under fire.

Many felt Chief Sculptor-Engraver Elizabeth Jones’ Discus Thrower design for the 1983 silver dollar and Mint graphic artist James M. Peed’s sketch of male and female Olympic torch bearers for the 1984 gold $10 coin also needed modifications.

Annunzio was outspoken in his criticism of the gold $10 coin design. He characterized the torchbearers as “Dick and Jane.” The Commission of Fine Arts questioned their distinctly Caucasian features, noting that most of the U.S. athletes in the track and field events were African Americans.

Treasury Department officials pointed out that they needed to give buyers some idea of what the coins would look like before sending out order blanks and beginning pre-sales. They also noted that the coin designs already had the official nod from Treasury Secretary Donald T. Regan. But Annunzio worried that the public’s reaction to the designs could be a harbinger of low sales.

The powerful subcommittee chairman declared that if it took returning to the floor of the House of Representatives to get better designs, he would.

Here are some more reminisces and inside stories.

Olympic coin sparks some controversy: From the Memory Bank

U.S. Mint medal series honors past presidents

Ex chief engraver recalls President Reagan’s medal

Olympic coin sparks some controversy

Critics assail headless nude models on statue, coin. This article From the Memory Bank series was first published in the June 22, 2015 issue of Coin World, available here.

The United States experienced a deep recession between 1980 and 1982.

1984 Olympic Coins - Cash In Your Coins

Robert Graham’s “Olympic Gateway” sculpture featuring headless nude male and females figures sparked criticism when selected as the dominant design element of the 1984 Olympic silver dollar. Graham also designed the Eagle reverse.

Rather than build new athletic venues, the United States Olympic Committee and the Los Angeles Olympic Organizing Committee opted to rely mostly on existing venues and to seek corporate funding and surcharges from sales of commemorative coins to finance hosting the Games of the XXIII Olympiad.

The opening ceremonies of the 1984 Summer Olympics were to be held in the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, which had been built for the 1932 Games.

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