Cash In Your Coins 2nd Edition on sale September 13, 2014

The second edition of my book Cash In Your Coins: Selling the Rare Coins You’ve Inherited goes on sale nationwide Sept. 13.

Cash In Your Coins 2nd Edition book cover

Cash In Your Coins: Selling the Rare Coins You’ve Inherited

Autographed copies of the expanded, updated 304-page book will be available exclusively at my Cash In Your Coins website for $9.95 plus shipping.

Non-autographed copies of the second edition will be available at the publisher’s web site, Whitman, as well as from booksellers like Amazon and hobby shops throughout the nation.

The first edition, published in June 2013, won the Numismatic Literary Guild’s “Best Specialized Book on Numismatic Investments” award for 2014, and a first-place nonfiction award from Ohio Professional Writers.

The second edition is expanded with 16 additional pages, updated case studies, a new chapter on taxes, new illustrations, and more. Continue reading

1982 Washington Commemorative Half Dollar – From the Memory Bank, part 20

Mint’s new chief sculptor-engraver’s first assignment to design 1982 Washington coin. This article first appeared in the August 25, 2014 issue of Coin World, available here

Elizabeth Jones' sketches for the obverse and reverse designs of the 1982 Washington commemorative half dollar - copyright Coin World

Elizabeth Jones’s sketches for the obverse and reverse designs of the 1982 Washington commemorative half dollar.

President Reagan’s signing into law Dec. 23, 1981, legislation calling for the issuance of a half dollar in 1982 commemorating the 250th anniversary of George Washington’s birth brought excitement and great collector expectations.

The authorization of the first U.S. commemorative coin in more than a quarter century also brought excitement to the Philadelphia Mint, where the chief sculptor-engraver, Elizabeth Jones, was getting settled in, having been sworn into office Oct. 27, 1981. Her first assignment would be designing the new coin.

Authorizing legislation mandated that designs for both the obverse and reverse of the coin be “emblematic” of the Washington anniversary, but did not dictate any specifics. Thus, Jones was able to work without restraint.

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Join me at the World’s Fair of Money, August 5-9

Chicago World's Fair of MoneyI will be the featured guest on Coin Show Radio from 3 to 3:20 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 6. The live webcast will originate from the World Mint Stage on the bourse floor of the American Numismatic Association’s World’s Fair of Money at the Donald E. Stephens Convention Center in Rosemont, Ill. Anyone interested in watching the show as it is being webcast may do so free of charge and seating is available. The live webcast will be available at Money.org and worldsfairofmoney.com. The convention center is located at 5555 North River Road.  Continue reading

1984 Los Angeles Olympic coin program – From the Memory Bank, part 19

Battle of wits waged in Congress over the number of coins for 1984 Los Angeles Olympic coin program. This article first appeared in the July 28, 2014 issue of Coin World, available here

Rep. Frank D. Annunzio, D-Ill and the Olympic coin program - copyright Coin World

Rep. Frank D. Annunzio, D-Ill

By mid-April 1982, Olympic officials and private marketers believed they had gained the upper hand in the battle over the number of commemorative coins to be produced to honor and financially support the 1984 Los Angeles Olympic Games.

They had enlisted House Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs Committee Chairman Fernand J. St. Germain, D-R.I., to introduce legislation to set the number of coins at 17, rather than 25 (approved earlier by the Senate). Having St. Germain as chief sponsor was a strong-arm tactic to force Subcommittee Chairman Frank D. Annunzio, D-Ill., to compromise from his insistence that the U.S. Treasury have control of both production and marketing and to accept the 17-coin number.

Annunzio countered by holding yet another Subcommittee on Consumer Affairs and Coinage hearing on May 11, during which Coin World Editor Margo Russell reported the result of a poll conducted by the publication.

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There’s a reason for 28-year gap in U.S. Commemorative Series

United States commemorative coins honor people, places, and events important in our nation’s history. Modern U.S. commemoratives are available directly from the U.S. Mint in the year they are issued and are attractive and affordable, a double plus for those new to coin collecting.

California collector JG wrote:

I recently began a collection of Early (1893-1954) commemorative half dollars and am curious as to why there were no commemorative halves minted between 1954 and 1982? Although there were years when many were minted (e.g. 1936) they were few in number other years, then the lengthy hiatus. Can you explain?

Today we refer to U.S. commemorative coins struck between 1893 and 1954 as the Early Series and those issued since 1982 as the Modern Series. In both the Early and Modern series, commemoratives have been issued in multiple denominations and at least three precious metals and copper-nickel. Thus it is possible to collect commemoratives by denomination, metal type, or as a complete collection. Continue reading

U.S. Olympic Coins – From the Memory Bank, part 18

1982 legislation was proposed as a ‘logical’ compromise to produce the first U.S. Olympic coins. This article first appeared in the June 23, 2014 issue of Coin World, available here

Skirmishes in the U.S. House of Representatives over the number of coins and marketing of the United States’ first modern Olympic coinage program that had begun in the summer of 1981 erupted into an intense battle during the spring of 1982.

A Government Accounting Office study, released in April 1982, cited five flaws with a Senate-approved proposal seeking 25 commemorative coins honoring the 1984 Olympic Games to be hosted by the city of Los Angeles.

Rep. Frank D. Annunzio, D-Ill., chairman of the House Banking Committee’s Subcommittee on Consumer Affairs and Coinage, took to the floor of the House to bring attention to the GAO report. The most worrisome problem, Annunzio warned, was that the GAO had been unable to obtain any documents from the private marketing group, the Los Angeles Olympic Organizing Committee, or the Treasury concerning the marketing arrangements. Continue reading